LAKE HUBERT WINTER UPDATE
January 2007

WEIRD WINTER WEATHER WORSENS WATER LEVELS
The long summer drought that continued all through this fall is still impacting North Central Minnesota and Lake Hubert in particular this winter. As of the middle of January, there was NO snow pack in the area. That snow pack normally serves as a moisture reservoir for spring run off into the lake especially when the ground is still frozen in late March and early April. Unless March produces historically heavy snowfall, Lake Hubert and other area lakes will be in critical shape come ice break up.

This will obviously impact boat access to the lake, the need for more dock sections, and possibly potential weed growth in sections of the lake that will be quite shallow compared to normal years. Trees and other vegetation have also been affected. Many younger trees with shallow root systems have shown the moisture stress by turning brown or dying.

The only upside to this winter without snow is the fantastic ice skating that has occurred from December all the way to late January. In fact, some skaters have been observed skating the entire perimeter of the lake as the existing ice is as smooth as glass with a minimum of heaves and cracks. Ice anglers also have obviously had a very easy time moving their shelters to anyplace on the lake that might hold fish.

CLARK LAKE CHANNEL PROVIDING A FLOW OF WATER
At first glance, it does appear as if there is some good news on water flow into Lake Hubert. For the month of January, there has been a slight flow of water into Lake Hubert from the Clark Lake channel. The best estimate on this flow is about ten gallons a minute.

So, the math question for you is this: If the flow is, indeed, ten gallons per minute, how long would this take to raise the lake level one inch?
Some help is provided for you as one inch of water on Lake Hubert weighs 293,314,266 pounds. One gallon of water typically weighs 8.3454 pounds.
That means that ten gallons (the current flow) weighs 83.44 pounds. OK, now go figure it out and the answer is below.

ANSWER TO THE MATH QUESTION
If you divide the weight of the water in one inch (293,314,266 pounds) by the weight of water flowing in per minute (83,454 pounds), it will take 3,514,682 minutes to raise Lake Hubert by one inch, or 58,578 hours, or 2440 days, or 6.68 years. At that rate, we’d better pray for precipitation!
(Note: the math for this answer was provided by LHCA president Chuck Corchran)

LAKE HUBERT WEB SITE NEWS ( www.LakeHubert.org )
Those of you who check often at our wonderful web site are probably noticing that the site is updated at least every two weeks and sometimes even more often than that. The LHCA appreciates your continued use of the web site for news, timely pictures, and important links to other frequently used sites such as the Department of Natural Resources.

Please remember that our web site is always looking for news, malicious gossip, Lake Hubert photos, and other items that might be of interest to our membership. Your contribution to this effort will be most appreciated!

KEEPING CONNECTED WITH THE LHCA
In order for the LHCA to keep its demographic information current, it is very important to inform the association of any address, phone, and e-mail changes that may have occurred. You can easily do this by using the web site e-mail address (LakeHubert@aol.com) or by noting the changes when your dues are sent to Bill Bergersen, P.O. Box 1283, Lake Hubert, MN.
56459-1283. (Please note that failure to keep your records current with the LHCA could result in severe penalties including mandatory service on the Board of Directors or ineligibility for the next rock bass tournament).

JERRY WILLIAMS LEAVING LAKE HUBERT
We are very sad to note that long time resident Jerry Williams is planning to leave his residence on Lake Hubert sometime in late spring. Jerry is our “Emeritus Member” of the LHCA as a result of his past service as president, advisor, conservation advocate, and constant outstanding example of good stewardship for the health and betterment of our lake. We will dearly miss his presence and counsel on the Board and we all offer our profound gratitude for everything he has done for the LHCA and the Lake Hubert community (Note: Jerry will be moving to Northfield, Minnesota. We are quite sure he will stay connected with us as a continuing member of the LHCA).
 
 

TEN TIPS FOR WHAT EVERYONE CAN DO TO PRESERVE LAKES
                     (Source: Initiative Quarterly, Fall 2006)

1. Keep Your Shoreline Natural – Preserving or installing a shoreline landscape that is rich in native species allows water to soak in rather than run off. Plants absorb nutrients and also trap sediments that fill in wetlands and lakes.
 
2. Know Your Lake and River Rules – It is unlawful in Minnesota to knowingly alter shoreline, fish habitat, or aquatic vegetation without a permit from the Minnesota DNR. Remember that shoreline areas provide important habitat for waterfowl, shorebirds, and fish.

3. Appreciate Aquatic Plants – Aquatic “weeds” are critical life-support systems for our lakes. With their amazing filtering abilities, native aquatic plants such as cattails and bulrushes are natural water purifiers. The rooted aquatic vegetation is also a veritable fish nursery. Thus, work to minimize the removal of shoreline aquatic vegetation.

4. Reduce Your Lawn – The fertilizers and clippings from “traditional lawns” contribute to poor lake water quality. Install a native landscape and mow less. Keep native trees and vegetation with their extensive root systems as they help stabilize the landscape, aid in groundwater recharge, and reduce runoff.

5. Maintain Your Septic System – Keep your septic system in good working order. It should be pumped at least every three years (more
if you use a garbage disposal or if you have heavy use of your lake residence by frequent company).

6. Reduce Roofs and Roads – Roofs, sidewalks, paved driveways, and roads increase the amount of rainwater that runs directly into our lakes. Run-off water carries fertilizers, household cleaners, paints,  solvents, pesticides, and motor oil. Thus, try to decrease the amount of hard surfaces on your property.

7. Properly Dispose of Animal Waste – Controlling pet and livestock waste improves the quality of our waters. Such waste can easily travel into our lakes because they are not subjected to the same wastewater treatment that human wastes are. Dispose of these wastes far from the water’s edge to help insure that bacteria, phosphorus and nitrogen  don’t end up in the water.

8. Be Conscious of All Lake and River Users – Shoreland owners and  users value Minnesota waters in many different ways. Part of being a good lake steward and neighbor is being considerate of others. Follow local watercraft rules and noise ordinances to help insure a positive experience for everyone who uses Minnesota waters for recreation.

9. Support Land Conservation – The donation or purchase of conservation easements is one of the most cost-effective ways to protect sensitive shorelines and watersheds from development.

     The LHCA has been very active in promoting conservation easements and can provide valuable assistance including access to legal counsel to implement easements (The LHCA has a very informative and updated “Conservation Easement” brochure to further explain this process. Please contact the LHCA if more information is needed).

10. Show Up, Speak Up, Write a Check – Decisions are made by those who show up and speak up, thus, join your lake association. Give money, time, input, and feedback to support organizations working to protect Minnesota’s waters for future generations. Share your knowledge with your neighbors and those elected and appointed  officials who represent you.
 

PLEASE NOTE THAT ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON MANY OF THESE TOPICS AND CONCERNS ARE AVAILABLE FROM THE LAKE HUBERT WEB SITE INCLUDING NEEDED LINKS TO RELATED WEB SITES: WWW.LAKEHUBERT.ORG.